Briefly Noted: Metro Squad seeking vehicle of interest on Leawood homicide case

The Leawood Police Department headquarters.

Metro Squad seeking vehicle of interest on Leawood homicide case. The Metro Squad is seeking additional information on a dark-colored Dodge Challenger seen leaving the parking lot soon after a shooting Friday night in Leawood that led to the death of a 24-year-old man. The shooting took place at State Line Apartments in the 13700 block of Kenneth Road. Zachary Morrisey, 24, of Kansas City, Missouri, was struck when an unknown subject walked up to the vehicle he sat in and began shooting. A second victim, a resident of the apartment complex, is being treated at a local trauma center after he first drove himself and Morrisey to a local urgent care center. Anyone who might have seen something or has video on their home surveillance systems is asked to contact the Metro Squad at 913-642-5555, ext. 461; email tips@leawood.org; or call the TIPS hotline at 816-474-TIPS. There is a reward of up to $2,000 available through the TIPS hotline for information in this case.

Rep. Davids: Support for lower drugs cost blocked by Senate. In an op-ed published by The Kansas City Star, Rep. Sharice Davids shared her support and vote last week to pass House Resolution 3, the Elijah Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act, which would lower the cost of prescription drugs in Kansas. If passed into law, the legislation would give Medicare the power to negotiate with drug companies for lower drug prices. Davids noted that nonpartisan analysts have found the bill would lower drug prices by up to 55% and save taxpayers and patients hundreds of billions of dollars. But Senate leaders will not bring HR 3 up for a vote, she wrote. [Sharice Davids: McConnell blocking drug price help that has blessing of Trump, House — The Kansas City Star]

The holiday season is a busy time of year for Kansas City area organists. But while fewer people are going to church — where people expect to hear organ music — and more churches are playing pop and rock style music for praise and worship, local organists have seen an uptick in interest in the organ. Organs in churches, like the one at Village Presbyterian Church in Prairie Village, are played in secular concerts. And youth are learning about the instrument from YouTube videos. [It’s their busiest time of the year, but Kansas City organists say they aren’t just for churches — KCUR]