Man pleads no contest to charges of making ‘upskirt’ videos at Roeland Park QuikTrip

John Thomas Britton, 64, entered a plea of no contest to three counts of invasion of privacy stemming from charges that he shot "upskirt" videos of school girls in Roeland Park.
John Thomas Britton, 64, entered a plea of no contest to three counts of invasion of privacy stemming from charges that he shot “upskirt” videos of school girls in Roeland Park.

John Thomas Britton, 64, pleaded no contest on Tuesday to counts of breach of privacy stemming from incidents earlier this year at the Roeland Park QuikTrip that led police to accuse him of shooting cell phone videos up the skirts of underage girls.

Britton, dressed in a dark suit and eyeglasses, remained largely silent during his appearance before Johnson County District Judge Stephen Tatum, limiting his comments to short replies to Tatum’s inquires about whether he understood his rights and the proceedings. As part of an agreement with prosecutors, Britton pleaded no contest to the first three breach of privacy charges in exchange for having the two remaining charges dropped.

Prior to Tatum’s acceptance of the plea, Assistant District Attorney Keith Henderson told the court that after being alerted to suspicious behavior at the Roe Boulevard QuikTrip in January, police had confiscated Britton’s phone and found two damning videos. In one 24 second video, two girls wearing school uniform skirts walk over the phone’s video camera just seconds after Britton is seen placing it on the ground. The girls, one 14 and one 15, were later identified by police and interviewed. Neither knew that they were being recorded. In the other video, Britton held the phone camera under the skirt of a 16 year old.

The mid-tier sentencing recommendations for any of the three counts to which Britton pleaded on Tuesday carry prison sentences of seven to 23 months and a fine of up to $100,000. But because Britton has no prior criminal record, he is likely to face probation instead, and would only see extended time in prison if he were to violate the terms of his probation agreement. Tatum did, however, suggest that Britton would face six days of “shock time” in county jail, which could be scheduled prior to its execution and could be broken up over the weekends.

Tatum also directed Britton to begin the process of registering as a sex offender in Johnson County and to prepare to complete a sex offender treatment program.

Sentencing for Britton is scheduled for August 2.